JEJAK KEHIDUPAN YESUS

 

Palm Sunday Procession, Jerusalem


Religious processions take place in Jerusalem on Palm Sunday each year to commemorate this event.

"They took palm branches and went out to meet him, shouting, 'Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Blessed is the King of Israel!'" (John 12:13).

 

Christian pilgrims carrying palm branches on the Mount of Olives pause to view the Old City of Jerusalem as they take part in the Palm Sunday procession on 2008 retracing the route taken by Jesus Christ as he entered the city of Jerusalem at the beginning of Holy Week, leading up to his crucifixion. The church of the Holy Sepulchre, traditionally accepted as the place of Christ's crucifixion and resurrection, is the complex with the large grey dome directly behind the golden Dome of the Rock.
 

The day following the somber dinner party at the home of Mary, Martha and Lazarus in Bethany, dated by one source as Sunday, March 28, 33 AD, Jesus made a bold entrance into Jerusalem. This step was taken deliberately, with every consideration for the consequences. Prior to this moment, Jesus had refused to allow any public acknowledgement as his being the Messiah and thus avoided intensifying any conflict with the Jewish religious authorities. But, the time was at hand and his opponents fully understood the strong messianic implications of the manner of his entry into Jerusalem. His riding upon a colt, the garments and palm branches in his path and the shouts of the Passover pilgrims all pointed to Jesus as the Messiah.

According to Matthew, Jesus ordered two of his disciples to bring him a donkey and her colt from the nearby village of Bethphage:
"As they approached Jerusalem and came to Bethphage on the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, 'Go to the village ahead of you, and at once you will find a donkey tied there, with her colt by her. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, tell him that the Lord needs them, and he will send them right away'" (Matthew 21:1-3).

 

Christian choir boys take part in the Palm Sunday procession as they walk on the Mount of Olives retracing the route taken by Jesus Christ as he entered the city of Jerusalem at the beginning of Holy Week, leading up to his crucifixion. Behind is the walled Old City of Jerusalem with its distinctive golden Dome of the Rock.
 

This, Matthew further states, fulfilled a messianic prophecy by Zechariah:
"Rejoice greatly, O Daughter of Zion! Shout, Daughter of Jerusalem! See, your king comes to you, righteous and having salvation, gentle and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey" (Zechariah 9:9 ).
Jesus' riding a donkey, however, was more than just a fulfillment of Zechariah's messianic prophecy. In 1 Kings, David told the priest Zadok, the prophet Nathan and Benaiah son of Jehoiada:
"Take your lord's servants with you and set Solomon my son on my own mule and take him down to Gihon. There shall Zadok the priest and Nathan the prophet anoint him king over Israel" (1 Kings 1:33-34).

By riding a donkey from Bethany to Jerusalem, rather than walking, Jesus intentionally brought together the prophecy of Zechariah and the tradition of anointing a king from the Davidic line. He, in fact, said "I am the Messiah" without expressing it verbally.
As Jesus road along the steep path from Bethphage over the summit of the Mount of Olives, a crowd made up of his Galilean followers, those who had witnessed the raising of Lazarus from the dead, and even some Judean supporters, "took palm branches and went out to meet him" while others spread their cloaks on the road before him, shouting, "Hosanna!" "Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!" "Blessed is the King of Israel!"

 

Christian pilgrims lift their hands in song as they walk with palm branches on the Mount of Olives on Palm Sunday retracing the route taken by Jesus Christ to enter Jerusalem at the beginning of Holy Week, leading up to his crucifixion. Behind is the walled Old City of Jerusalem with its distinctive golden Dome of the Rock. Behind the done is the Churh of the Holy Sepulchre.
 

The custom of spreading one's outer garments in the path was reserved for royalty. By shouting "Hosanna" [from Hebrew yasha ("save") + na ("now" or "please") or "save now"], the crowd was pleading for Jesus to save them from Roman oppression and domination; by waving palm branches they were fanning the flames of Jewish nationalism, for the palm symbolized the Macabbean Revolt and the subsequent Hasmonean rule from the 160's BC to 63 BC. It was as if the people were waving Jewish flags, hoping to see Jesus do to the Romans what Judah Macabbee had done to the Greeks in 164 BC reestablish an independent Jewish kingdom. Jesus, however, was not a heroic warrior-messiah entering on a horse with battle cries and weapons, but a gentle Prince of Peace, riding humbly on a donkey, bringing salvation.

 

Palm Sunday on the Mount of Olives, a modern-day commemoration of Jesus triumphal entry into Jerusalem


Only John (12:13) mentions "palm branches," which the people apparently brought from Jericho, since palm trees are not native to Jerusalem (although you do see them throughout the city today). In Matthew (21:8), the crowd "cut branches from the trees;" in Mark (11:8), the people spread "branches they had cut in the fields;" while in Luke (19:36), branches are not mentioned, only that the "people spread their cloaks on the road."

 

Den Vincent en Jeng Verina saw the Holy City JERUSALEM.....hosanna in the highest.....hosanna forever more.....there would not pass away
 

 

GOD IS THE LORD WHO DOES MIRACLES

 

         

 

 

GO YE INTO ALL THE WORLD, AND PREACH THE GOSPEL TO EVERY CREATURE

 

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